Opinions

It's Time To Marie Kondo Our Health And Fitness Routines

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Since Around The Bay (final race blog pending) I’ve been doing what I seem to do after every big race—resting, recovering, and digging into my future goals. What do I want to do with my body next?

This is a big question—and one that has been especially top-of-mind after listening to Jillian Murphy’s recent Food Freedom/Body Love podcast episode: “What’s your motivation to move?” (Spotify) (Apple).

In the episode, Murphy asks her listeners to examine their reasons for engaging in exercise and movement. She also brings up one often overlooked aspect of moving your body: joy.

This Is Your Life On Marie Kondo

You can see where I’m going with this, right? It’s not a particularly limber mental somersault. If you’ve been on the internet in 2019, you’ve seen the memes and you’ve heard Marie Kondo’s iconic question: “does this spark joy?

In the same way that you can get rid of those anonymous tangled power cords for long-lost electronics in the Rubbermaid in your basement, so too can you decide that you hate spin class and ditch it to try Zumba, or rock climbing, or aerial yoga. You can stop cutting carbs if it makes you miserable. You can opt out of the things you hate, and try things you love.

In fact, you should—for your health.

 
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Kondo-ing Your Movement Choices

It stands to reason that if you hate doing something… you hate doing it. It also stands to reason that you aren’t going to want to do things you hate, and they won’t make you feel good.

Doesn’t it make sense to give up hot yoga if you hate sweating like a gatorade commercial and you’ve always been curious about pole dancing? Or to join a softball league if you’ve been grinding out runs by yourself and getting furious about it? You might find it easier to move your body if you find the way your body loves to move instead of focusing on suffering to get the most calorie-burn for your buck.

I’d love to think we’re in an age where we’re all choosing exercise that we like, with the motive of keeping us happy and healthy. Then I remember diet culture still exists and that some idiot on the internet tried to fat shame Rihanna once. So, yeah. If you’re out there, scraping through workouts and hating every second, ask yourself why. Does this exercise bring me joy? No?

Time to try kickboxing. Or surfing. Or quidditch.

Kondo-ing Your Food Choices

Have you decided to try going low carb or gluten-free, or raw vegan or Paleo or Primal or pegan or vegan or vegetarian? Are you suffering through South Beach, Atkins, WW, Wheat Belly, Whole30, Keto, the Master Cleanse, the Screaming Apple Diet or any other trendy diet on the market?

Is it bringing you joy? But if you’re suffering trying to eat with self-inflicted restrictions that have you stressing out about the grams of sugar and carbs in carrots… It’s time to toss those restrictions out the window and start consuming joyfully. Life’s too short to skip all of the birthday cake, or avoid bananas for having “too much sugar” or cry over missing out on cheese.

Kondo-ing Your Social Media

I’ve seen a post a few times on Instagram that pretty much hits this sentiment on the head, “you can unfollow anyone who makes you feel bad about your life.”

If the clean-eating influencer crowd makes you get down on yourself, or someone’s weekly weigh-ins make you grumpy, it’s time to Kondo those accounts, baby. Time to hit unfollow. You can control your digital world, why not make a you-topia of people who genuinely inspire you?

The bottom line here is that we often force ourselves to take on “healthy” habits that promise future happiness—and we hate these habits in the meantime. We think when we’ve restricted enough and sweat through enough squats to make it to the land free of cellulite, where celery juice flows like rivers, we will be worthy. We will be happy.

The truth is that the healthiest habits are the ones that bring us joy in the process.

So, what’s sparked you lately? Let me know on Instagram or Facebook!

Opinion: We Need to Ditch the Idea of Arts Vs. Athletics

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Athletes are artists.

The thought re-occurred to me watching Adidas’ latest “Here to Create” ad during March Madness. (Shoutouts Villanova!)

If you haven’t seen it, the ad features an array of athletes looking into the camera, and telling the audience: “see my creativity.” It’s a quick 30-second watch, check it out:

The whole thing got my gears turning about something I’ve been wrestling with for more than a decade. Athletes are creatives—even if society likes to play up those who play sports athletics and those who create art as opposites. 

Sure, there's crossover between the two worlds when it comes to activities like dance, or even yoga… But chiefly, the image of athletes being pure sweat and grit is often a foil against the sensitive and soulful artist. 

For a long time, I believed I had to choose. 

In high school, I thought of myself as artsy and misunderstood. Sweating was for JOCKS. I probably unfairly wrote off some of my athletic classmates as shallow… But then, it wasn’t like I had constructed this notion from nowhere—the media was there to back me up.

Movies and television reinforce the identity story of athleticism vs. pretty much every other interest—think: The Breakfast Club, think Mean Girls. You can’t be a great poet and kill it at lacrosse. You can’t have a photographic eye and a killer right hook.

Every once in awhile, Zac Efron wins the big basketball game AND nails the singing audition—but on the whole, the media keeps resubscribing us to the idea of these two things are enemies (#fakenews). The problem is we believe it, and now the next generation is growing up believing it. Finally though, our stories have begun to change. Finally, we're catching up. 

Now that I’m older, I'm a writer and a runner. I know that the call to an athletic vocation can pull at the soul as much as any artistic endeavour. Just like an artist has to discover where their talent and passion lies, so does an athlete—painting or poetry? Sprinting or ski jumping?

There are stories in my sweat.

When they find what speaks to them, both put in the hours to hone their craft. There is deep digging. There is soul searching. There are failures, improvements, and masterpieces. (Think game-winning slapshots in OT or Best Original Screenplay.) There are experiments—new paints, new shoes. There are competitive meets and opening nights. There is struggle—and there is always art in struggle. 

Studies have shown that athletes can make better students. Without the stranglehold notion of arts and sports as war enemies, I'd bet they can make great artists too—and vice versa.

In my personal experience, practicing my sport amplifies my creativity. There are stories in my sweat. I’ve been been struck by the opening line of a poem mid-run, and spent the last miles writing it in my head. I connect with music the most deeply when I’m moving to it. When I got a tattoo after my half marathon last year, I felt both like art and artist. Watching people cry on the Olympic podium or celebrate at marathon finish line move me as much as any Oscar-winning performance. 

Sports shake off the sleep of everyday existence. We are awake, so we create. 

In the future, athletics could be the place where the pumping heart meets the artistic soul—we just have to start talking about it. Stop making people—especially young people—choose. Spread the word: you can have it all. You can do both. You're not the only one out there smashing the standard—in fact, you're in pretty good company.

Serena Williams paints. Terry Crews is an amazing artist and actor. Britney Spears was a point guard in high school (and honey if you think busting moves and singing on stage at the same time isn’t athletic as hell, get on board). 

So what’s your sport? What’s your art? How do they work together? It's time to be proud of your intersections. It’s time to smash the myth and create a whole new generation of Zac Efrons. (...Err...)

Maybe it starts with a TV ad. Maybe it starts with us.

Personally, I’ll be brainstorming the next time I put on my running shoes.